Archive For The “Sport” Category

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

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Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

B-cell CLL is malignant disorder of lymphocytes characterized by expansion and accumulation of small lymphocytes of B-cell origin. CLL is essentially identical to B-cell small lymphocytic lymphoma in the REAL and WF classifications. CLL is the most common form of in the States and affects twice as many men as women. Although it can occur…

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Wilson’s Disease

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Wilson’s Disease

wilson’s disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting 1 to 3 per 100,000 population. It is caused by defective hepatic excretion of copper. The consequence is copper-induced injury to many organs, particularly the liver and brain. Copper is an essential trace element. Organ meats(particularly liver), nuts, seafood, and seeds are rich dietary…

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Plasma Lipoprotein Physiology

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Plasma Lipoprotein Physiology

The major properties of the plasma lipoproteins a summarized . Normal men women consume 80 to 120 g of fat(triglyceride[TG]) daily. Dietary fat is hydrolyzed by pancreatic lipase, absorbed by the intestinal mucosal cells, and secreted into the mesenteric lymphatics as chylomicrons. One hundred grams of dietary fat mixed in an adult plasma volume of…

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HODGKIN’S DISEASE

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HODGKIN’S DISEASE

Hodgkin’s disease(HD) is the most common lymphoma in young adults. It has a bimodal distribution in the United States and industrialized countries, with the larger peak occurring between ages 15 and 35 and a second smaller peak occurring in patients older than 50. The etiology of Hodgkin’s disease remains enigmatic. Although EBV is frequently present…

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Chemotherapy

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Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy can cure some cancers and can palliate intimate knowledge of the pharmacology and side effects of each agent, as well as their interactions with one another, is essential for their use. Wise use of chemotherapeutic agents also requires familiarity with the guidelines for withholding further treatment if the patient’s quality of life will not…

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Bleeding Peptic Ulcers

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Bleeding Peptic Ulcers

Peptic ulcer disease is the most common cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, which occurs in 15% to 20% of patients.Although bleeding ceases spontaneously in 80%, the mortality of bleeding ulcers is 6% to 7%. The major risk factor for bleeding ulcers is consumption of NSAIDs. Patients with bleeding ulcers present with hematemesis, melena, or hematochezia,…

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Acute And Chronic Hepatitis

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Acute And Chronic Hepatitis

The term hepatitis is applied to a broad category of clinicopathologic conditions that result from the produced by a viral, toxic, pharmacologic, or immunemediated attack on the liver. The common pathologic features of hepatitis are hepatocellular necrosis, which may be focal or extensive, and inflammatory cell infiltration of the liver, which may predominate in the…

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SCREENING TESTS OF HEPATOBILIARY DISEASE

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SCREENING TESTS OF HEPATOBILIARY DISEASE

Screening tests of hepatobiliary disease may be divided into two categories: (1) tests of biliary obstruction and/or cholestasis and(2) tests of hepatocellular damage, based on the mechanisms responsible for the abnormal test. However, none of the tests is specific either category, and it is the overall pattern and the relative magnitude of abnormalities in these…

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Clinical symptoms of Esophageal Disease

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Clinical symptoms of Esophageal Disease

Dysphagia is the sensation that food is hindered sticking in its normal passage from the mouth to the stomach. Dysphagia is divided into two distinct syndromes: that resulting from abnormalities affecting the pharynx and UES(oropharyngeal dysphagia) and that caused by any of a variety of disorders affecting the esophagus itself(esophageal dysphagia). Oropharyngeal dysphagia is usually…

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Antiphospholipid Syndrome and the Kidney

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Antiphospholipid Syndrome and the Kidney

Patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome may develop venous or arterial thrombosis, and recurrent fetal loss. This disorder may be associated with systemic disorders such as systemic lupus erythemaatosus or other autoimmune diseases, certain infections, and drugs, or it may occur alone as a primary disease. It is associated with a false-positive result of a Venereal…

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